• Our hope-filled future is bound up in sharing the story of Jesus, in discipling others, in bringing those disciples together into communities of believers, and in developing and releasing those believers to create other communities... till Jesus the King comes again!

What we learned

Here are some quotes from our very first posts on King’s Cross:

“However, if I really understand God, and if I’m truly amazed by Who He is and what He has done, then I would live a life full of devotion, focused on Him.  I’m asked to join Him in this dance, ignore my inhibitions and ignorance, and humbly ask, as I dance with my Savior, “Why me?!”  I don’t deserve the opportunity to join in the dance, but that’s just it.  It’s all about Him inviting me, not what I deserve.” (ch 1)

“Left to ourselves, we continue in our brokenness. This is the reason His call is so significant, He is calling us from a self-centered, self-destructive life by calling us into a whole relationship which requires sole devotion to Himself, so much so that “all other attachments in [our] lives look like hate compared to Him.” Jesus cannot and will not accept moderation, His call is for complete devotion, “He must be the goal.”” (ch 2)

“It is not possible to write about Jesus and his cross without writing about sin as our biggest problem. But he pushes us further. Tapping into C.S. Lewis, as pastors are prone to do, Keller wrestles with this Biblical passage in light of a Lewis story and gives us another phrase – “not deep enough.” And he recommends this: Jesus will cut deep in dealing with our sin. He will pull back the scales. As he did with the paralytic he will identify our bigger problem and then he will go deep enough to provide the core healing that is needed.” (ch 3)

“Experiencing anew real “rest” comes when a greater treasure displaces our constant search for acceptance in others.  “On the cross Jesus was saying of the work underneath your work – the thing that makes you truly weary, this need to prove yourself because who you are and what you do are never good enough – that it is finished.  He has lived the life you should have lived, he has died the death you should have died.  If you rely on Jesus’ finished work, you that God is satisfied with you.  You can be satisfied with life.””   (ch 4)

“Oh, to be like You Jesus. That’s what I feel when I read this. I have a hard time resting. I know I need it.  Jesus was sure it was time to ‘get away’. He knew that there was just so much a person can handle . . . and He is God! When He spoke to the wind and waves, there was ‘dead calm’, much like a guy sleeping on a cushion. He didn’t need the storm to stop for His own rest. Perhaps He did it for His disciples so that they could see His ability to take care of them. Perhaps He was just proclaiming the importance of rest in a dramatic way . . . reconciling the world to Himself in inexplicable ways.”  (ch 5)

 

Share your insights to the book, King’s Cross with the larger WT community.  Post your responses here to the question: “What thought or idea from King’s Cross has brought about a change in your heart and attitude?”

4 Responses

  1. I’ve enjoyed the journey through this book, and look forward to the next book we will read together. In a word, Cross. I feel the book addressed an attitude adjustment in my life: to follow Jesus is to bear my cross. The followership He invites me to is not easy going, problem free, without struggle, evil, and hardship. To pick up my cross, daily, and follow Jesus is a real challenge when I simply don’t feel like it, or my heart is prone to wander, and/or I find it too darn hard! Keller, and the interpretation of his work through my colleagues, helped me with this quite a bit.

    Quick recommendation for those who liked Keller. Try The Prodigal God. It’s easy to read, with some profound and fresh insights. The Gospel will really come alive for you as you read it.

    http://www.amazon.com/The-Prodigal-God-Recovering-Christian/dp/0525950796

  2. I’ve enjoyed the journey through this book, and look forward to the next book we will read together. In a word, Cross. I feel the book addressed an attitude adjustment in my life: to follow Jesus is to bear my cross. The followership He invites me to is not easy going, problem free, without struggle, evil, and hardship. To pick up my cross, daily, and follow Jesus is a real challenge when I simply don’t feel like it, or my heart is prone to wander, and/or I find it too darn hard! Keller, and the interpretation of his work through my colleagues, helped me with this quite a bit.

    Quick recommendation for those who liked Keller. Try The Prodigal God. It’s easy to read, with some profound and fresh insights. The Gospel will really come alive for you as you read it.

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