• Our hope-filled future is bound up in sharing the story of Jesus, in discipling others, in bringing those disciples together into communities of believers, and in developing and releasing those believers to create other communities... till Jesus the King comes again!

If I could dream again

Have you ever found yourself ‘dreaming’ of how things might go better if even small things changed?  Have you ever ‘dreamed’ about the potential that would be released in the ministry and relationship spheres of a team if solutions were found for certain issues that beleaguered them?

If I could dream, if I could envision how we as a global community of World Team would be different four months from now, I would see a community of workers who choose to think well of others and hear them out.kids-listening

Whether it is a leader-leader, leader-worker, or worker-worker relationship, I am often surprised by how little ‘weight’ we give to the thoughts, ideas and direction of others.  In the case of leaders, I have noticed an unspoken assumption that whenever a leader ‘speaks’ (in writing or in person), their input can be discounted because the thinking is that he/she must not have the best in mind for those he/she leads.  In the case of teammates, we may talk much about community, but in the end ‘we will do what we have to do’ and will choose to ignore the input of others in our community to do what we (personally) think is best.

Yes, we can disagree with others with whom we work.  However, are we actually ‘mining’ the feedback, direction or ideas we receive for all it can teach us?  Is our style of followership causing those who lead us to ‘groan’ rather than ‘be joyful’ and thus depriving ourselves of their influence in our lives?

It’s a hard sentence to get out, but it might help us choose to think well of others and hear them out: “So tell me more about what you mean when you said …

If I could dream, if I could envision how we as a global community of World Team would be different four months from now, I would see a community of workers who choose to think well of others and hear them out.

11 Responses

  1. Thanks for this post and the previous one. I will speak honestly and say that the first thing that popped into my head was, “Gee, I wonder if he is thinking about me. Am I unforgiving? Does he see me that way?” I am self-centered and self-serving, wanting others to see me in a good light. My motivation isn’t to be Christ like. Thinking well of others starts in my heart, asking God to forgive me of being judgmental and wanting their approval when I sometimes begrudge them of my approval because they don’t measure up to “my standards.”

    • I certainly didn’t have anyone particularly in mind. Like you, I know that the ‘unforgiving tendency’ is in my heart. ‘Dreaming’ of how we could be different drives me back to Christ to grow more in that grace that I often forget has been demonstrated in so many ways to me.

  2. Good thoughts; good topic! Sounds like a trust issue as well. How can we build more trust on our teams (trusting & being trustworthy)?

  3. I am convinced that pride is the barrier that keeps us from listening to each other. Often I catch myself listening for a pause so I can insert my opinion or knowledge. When my wife shares, do I really wanting to know what she means or do I want to defend myself or focus instead on my agenda?

    A spirit of humility is the attitude of a learner—wanting to grow because I am needy. Proverbs tells us to seek wisdom as learners but that fools simply won’t listen.

    This is a call for repentance. Pride resists, but humility beacons. I choose humility!

    • Pride is certainly one alement. Jack Miller (World Harvest Mission) used to say all sin could find its roots in pride and unbelief. So I guess the question for me is how is unbelief expressing itself in my lack of interest in others and what they are saying?

      • Good question!!! Conrads point to unbelief as a lack of trust. If unbelief keeps me from acknowledging God at work in and through my fellow workers, I won’t be inclined listen to them.

      • That’s certainly one way ‘unbelief’ might demonstrated. Another might be through independence — not seeing the crucial need for God or for the fellowship of others. Could lead to just ‘blowing off’ people’s insights or just not seeking them.

      • https://jdgreear.com/blog/five-ways-to-grow-a-culture-of-trust/

        This morning I read this insightful article about growing a culture of trust by J.D. Greear, pastor of Summit, the church my son, Stephen, and his family attend. He makes many good points but misses the key point of desiring and valuing the input of others.

      • Thanks for sharing that link, Albert. Very good practical advice about growing a culture of trust.

      • Thanks for sharing the link. I have read at least one of JD Greear’s book, but will look forward to reading this article. All that to day, that we can all ‘miss’ key gospel elements any time we speak, and we need the input of others.

      • Thanks for sharing the link. I have read at least one of JD Greear’s book, but will look forward to reading this article. All that to day, that we can all ‘miss’ key gospel elements any time we speak, and we need the input of others.

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